Home // Blog Posts // Student Scholarship Award Winners 2016/17

Student Scholarship Award Winners 2016/17

January 10, 2017

MiSPP is committed to contributing annually to assist in student scholarships and aid. Scholarship and financial assistance funding is supported by gifts from alumni, family, and friends. Generally, funds are disbursed in the form of tuition credit.

This academic year Jessica Dluzynksi (PsyD 4), was awarded the Jill Benton Humanistic Psychology Scholarship (JBHPS), and Quaneece Calhoun (PsyD 2), was awarded the Aombaye Ramsey Diversity Award (ARDA). The honorees have written acceptance statements for their scholarship awards.


Jill Benton Humanistic Psychology Scholarship (JBHPS)

This scholarship honors Jill Benton, former MiSPP librarian and alum, and her commitment to humanistic psychology. The JBHPS supports a PsyD student who is committed to advancing the science and practice of humanistic psychology as demonstrated by excellence in scholarship.

Dluzynski Jessica  Atrium

Jessica Dluzynksi (PsyD 4)

“I am truly honored to be this year’s recipient of the Jill Benton Humanistic Psychology Scholarship. Since I set foot in MiSPP and began my graduate education in the master’s program, I knew it was a special place. Interaction among students, faculty and staff is respectful, transparent, and emits a strong sense of community. The ability to learn and grow in such a supportive, yet challenging environment has afforded me the opportunity to discover more about myself as layperson and as a clinician. My experiences at MiSPP have further solidified my beliefs that humanity is innately good, that interactions within high-stress environments can be mutually respectful, and that humans can learn to be free yet connected to others and coexist in multidimensional ways. For me, finding MiSPP and humanistic psychology helped me to comprehend my personal experiences and values as well as to better articulate the essence of my being and desire for boundless self-actualization through learning.

Over the years, I volunteered as a student liaison at MiSPP open houses, participated in various community events concerning mental health, and had responsibility of training incoming practicum students at multiple clinical sites upon completion of my contract. Upon recommendation, I assisted various faculty members for 5 semesters as a teacher assistant in the master’s program. Additionally, as a member of multiple research teams, I collaborated with others to study diverse topics such as empathy and online therapy, life satisfaction within the LGBT community, and human-animal interactions. I have presented posters at the regional and national level, and served as a panel member of a symposium at the national level. This past year, I became a published author when The Humanistic Psychologist accepted a project completed with one of my research teams.

Most recently, I was re-elected for a second term as the President of the Psi Chi chapter at MiSPP. I consider election to any position of leadership to be a personal honor, and I take to my responsibilities very sincerely. I am committed to serving the members of our chapter and providing various opportunities to further scientific inquiry and discovery through scholarship and outreach. Upholding the values of humanistic psychology is important to me in all aspects of my life, as they seem to be embedded within my being. My love for scholarship through respectful inquiry will persist for a lifetime.”


Aombaye Ramsey Diversity Award (ARDA)

The Aombaye Ramsey Diversity Award (ARDA) was created in 2004 to honor Dr. Aombaye Ramsey’s lifelong commitment to social justice. This award supports a PsyD student who shares that same commitment to advocate on behalf of diversity issues. Priority will be given to applicants who belong to an ethnic, racial, or cultural group traditionally underrepresented in the field of psychology.

Quaneece

Quaneece Calhoun (PsyD 2)

“For majority of my educational career I have been at predominantly white institutions, with a plethora of turbulent experiences. It is important to me to be an educating force that advocates for the experiences of Black students and professionals. Oftentimes, when there is not overt racism and/or discrimination the frequent nicks and slams of microaggressions go unnoticed. It is my goal to provide valuable information about how to recognize these situations and how to provide a safe space for the individuals experiencing them. This award solidified and validated my experiences and my motivation to continue fighting. I hope I can one day be an inspiration to others much like Aombaye Ramsey, and others like him, were to me.”